Sake Flask

Dublin Core

Title

Sake Flask

Subject

Arts-Ceramics; Daily Life-Food

Description

Tokkuri, or sake flasks, were produced in great quantity by the Bizen kilns in the Momoyama period. In this example, clean lines define the plump, barrel-shaped body, thin neck, and crisply finished mouth. The neat, concise form, made from a relatively fine-grained clay, provides a sympathetic surface for the red diagonal streaks which resulted from shielding a vessel wrapped in rice straw from direct contact with the flames during firing. The straw burns away, leaving the hidasuki on a background of unscorched white clay.

Source

Money Hickman et al, "Japan's Golden Age: Momoyama" Dallas Museum of Art, 1996, scan of image on p.217, pl. 86.

Contributor

Woudenberg, Annie
St. Olaf College

Rights

Materials may be used for educational, non-commercial purposes only.

Format

Image/jpg

Type

Still image

Identifier

soc000240

Coverage

Japan
Japan - Azuchi-Momoyama 1573 - 1615
1573-1615 CE
Chugoku (region), Okayama-ken (prefecture), Okayama (inhabited place)
7004752
Okayama, Japan

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

583 w x 768 h, 72 ppi

Files

1888.jpg

Collection

Citation

“Sake Flask,” ASIANetwork IDEAS Project, accessed December 17, 2017, http://www.ideasproject.org/items/show/4553.