Kailash Cave Temple, entrance

Dublin Core

Title

Kailash Cave Temple, entrance

Subject

Religions-Hinduism; Religions-Sites; Arts-Architecture

Description

In the 8th and 9th centuries CE, the Kailash Cave Temple was carved out of the volcanic rock that formed countless plateaus in the western ghats (small mountain range), part of the geological formation known as the Deccan Plateau. Part of a group of 34 caves carved into the side of this plateau, Kailash, cave number 16, is monumental by any standards. The Kailash rock-cut temple stands 30 meters (99 feet) high, 52 meters (170 feet) in length, and 33 meters (108 feet) wide. The other 33 caves, Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain, were created by digging into the side of the plateau much like other cave dwellings, but Kailash appears to have been literally excavated from the top in order to create a free-standing temple encircled by smaller cave shrines.

Date

2003-01

Contributor

Benton, Cathy
Lake Forest College

Rights

Copyright: April 2003 Cathy Benton. Images and content on this site are available for educational and research purposes, provided due recognition is given to the author. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond fair use requires the written permission of the photographer.

Format

Image/jpg

Type

Still image

Identifier

cbind0115

Coverage

India
Maharashtra (state), Ellora (inhabited place)
1075244

Still Image Item Type Metadata

Physical Dimensions

1280 w x 960 h

Files

https://s3.amazonaws.com/omeka-net/9473/archive/files/15447b0c19e5e3be408ddd2c45ee317c.jpg

Citation

“Kailash Cave Temple, entrance,” ASIANetwork IDEAS Project, accessed December 14, 2017, http://www.ideasproject.org/items/show/4275.